Call

Blog

Gyms taking extra measures amid Coronavirus

The spread of the Coronavirus is causing people to rethink how sanitary and safe their spaces are, including GYMS.

Step One – Let’s Avoid Irrational Thinking:

  • Let’s stockpile toilet paper and get into store brawls defending our stockpile.
  • Let’s wear face masks even though we are well and taking a walk outdoors.
  • Let’s euthanize our pets just in case, as the virus can pass between mammals.
  • Let’s assume anyone coughing has Coronavirus.
  • It’s all a beat up.
  • You should go to work or the gym, even though you are ill.
  • That it only affects old people and they’re expendable.
  • That the Chinese Government introduced it as a form of sanctioned euthanasia to increase the efficiency of it’s workforce.

That’s irrational – wouldn’t you agree?

Step Two – Let’s Practice Rational Thinking:

Rationality factors in all information that is available and uses reason and logic to establish and verify facts and make decisions – rather than an emotional, instinctive or even cultural response.

Humans think overwhelmingly intuitively rather than rationally. We perceive what is apparent to us and attribute difference in perception to the fault of others. Many cognitive biases are unconscious, and we assume they affect others more than ourselves. But we CAN think and behave rationally, or not.

Rationality is also relative: if we accept a model in which benefiting oneself is optimal, then rationality is equated with selfish behaviour; whereas if we accept a model in which benefiting the group is optimal, then selfish behaviour is deemed irrational.

Step Three – Follow Recommendations of Rational Bodies:

World Health Organisation

Advice from the Global Scientific and Medical Community

The Australian Government – Department of Health

  • Travel – people returned from a country or region that is at high or moderate risk for COVID-19 should monitor their health closely. Or People who think they may have been in close contact with a confirmed case.
  • Symptoms including a fever, a cough and shortness of breath mean you should isolate yourself (14 day incubation period) immediately and urgently seek medical attention and testing.
  • While coronavirus is of concern, it is important to remember that most people displaying symptoms such as fever, cough, sore throat or tiredness are likely suffering with a cold or other respiratory illness.
  • Note – carriers can be asymptomatic.
  • The virus is most likely to spread from person-to-person through coughs or sneezes or touching contaminated objects or surfaces (such as door handle, computers or tables) and then touching your face.
  • Practicing good hand and sneeze/cough hygiene is the best defence against most viruses – frequent hand washing with soap and water, covering your cough and sneeze and disposing of tissues and using alcohol-based hand sanitiser.
  • And if unwell, avoid contact with others – 1.5 metres.
  • There is no specific treatment for coronavirus. Seek Medical Attention – however call ahead.
  • The use of masks can help to prevent transmission of disease from infected patients to others – you do not need to wear a mask if you are healthy.

Step Four – Implement Cleanliness and Hygiene best practices as a Community at Rushcutters Health:

  • We can’t be hermits and we are going to be social so just be aware of the situation and clean up after ourselves – let’s double down on the process of sanitising all the equipment that is being used.
  • We actually want to exercise, we want to stay active because it’s proven to help our immune system as well as release some of the stress but we’re sweating so bring and use a towel.
  • Let’s follow some basic hygiene down to washing our hands before and after our exercise session.
  • Use a tissue and cover your mouth when you cough or sneeze.
  • Try to avoid touching your face.
  • Let’s practice common sense and think of the common good – if we have a bad cough or we feel really unwell – let’s stay at home until we are in fact well enough to train. Rest is an underestimated cure.